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Journal of Digital Imaging

, Volume 11, Supplement 1, pp 22–26 | Cite as

Prototype internet consultation system for radiologists

  • Boris Kovalerchuk
  • James Ruiz
  • Evgenii Vityaev
  • Steven Fisher
Sessions Session II Value-Added Radiology

Abstract

The overall purpose of this study is to develop a prototype radiological consultation system. We concentrate our work on prototype software environment for the system. The system provides a second diagnostic opinion based on similar cases, incorporating the experience of radiologists, their diagnostic rules and a database of previous cases. The system allows a radiologist to enter the description of a particular case using the lexicon such as BI-RADS of American College of Radiology and retrieve the second diagnostic opinion (probable diagnosis) for a given case. The system also allows a radiologist to get other important information too. These advances are based on a new computational intelligence technique and firstorder logic. We implemented a rule-based prototype diagnostic system. Two experimental Internet versions are currently available on the web and are under testing and evaluation of design. The diagnosis is based on the opinions of radiologists in combination with the statistically significant diagnostic rules extracted from the available database.

Keywords

Linear Discriminant Analysis Probable Diagnosis Consultation System Computational Intelligence Technique True False 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Boris Kovalerchuk
    • 3
    • 1
    • 2
  • James Ruiz
    • 3
    • 1
    • 2
  • Evgenii Vityaev
    • 3
    • 1
    • 2
  • Steven Fisher
    • 3
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyWoman’s HosptialBaton Rouge
  2. 2.Institute of MathematicsRussian Academy of ScienceNovosibirskRussia
  3. 3.Department of Computer ScienceCentral Washington UniversityEllensburg

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