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Annals of Nuclear Medicine

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 83–88 | Cite as

Relationship between the biodistributions of radioactive metal nuclides in tumor tissue and the physicochemical properties of these metal ions

  • Atsushi Ando
  • Itsuko Ando
  • Shigeru Sanada
  • Tatsunosuke Hiraki
  • Tetsuo Takeuchi
  • Kinichi Hisada
  • Norihisa Tonami
Original Article

Abstract

This study was undertaken to elucidate the relationship between the biodistribution of radioactive metal nuclides in tumor tissue and its physicochemical properties.

Potassium analogs (86Rb,134Cs,201Tl) were taken up into viable tumor tissue, although22Na concentrated in necrotic tumor tissue.67Ga and111In were more predominant in inflammatory tissue than in the viable and necrotic tumor tissue.169Yb and167Tm accumulated in viable tumor tissue and tissue containing viable and necrotic tumor tissue.67Ga,111In,169Yb and167Tm were bound to the acid mucopolysaccharide with a mol. wt. of about 10,000 daltons in the tumor tissue.46Sc,51Cr,95Zr,181Hf,95Nb,182Ta, and103Ru were highly concentrated in inflammatory tissue and were bound to the acid mucopolysaccharides with a mol. wt. exceeding 40,000 daltons.65Zn and103Pd concentrated in viable tumor tissue and were bound to the protein in the tissue.

The results suggest that the difference in intra-tumor distribution of these elements is caused by a difference in the binding substances (or status) of these elements in the tissues, and the binding substance is determined by physicochemical properties of the elements. We therefore conclude that the biodistribution of radioactive metal ions in tumor tissue is determined by its own physicochemical properties.

Key words

biodistribution macroautoradiogram radioactive metal nuclides physicochemical properties tumor tissue 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Atsushi Ando
    • 1
  • Itsuko Ando
    • 1
  • Shigeru Sanada
    • 1
  • Tatsunosuke Hiraki
    • 1
  • Tetsuo Takeuchi
    • 2
  • Kinichi Hisada
    • 2
  • Norihisa Tonami
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Health Sciences, Faculty of MedicineKanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan
  2. 2.School of Medicine, Faculty of MedicineKanazawa UniversityJapan

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