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Annals of Nuclear Medicine

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 361–366 | Cite as

Evaluation of the brain uptake properties of [1-11C]labeled hexanoate in anesthetized cats by means of positron emission tomography

  • Yojiro Sakiyama
  • Kiichi Ishiwata
  • Kenji Ishii
  • Keiichi Oda
  • Hinako Toyama
  • Shin-ichi Ishii
  • Hitomi Nakayama
  • Akio Sato
  • Michio Senda
Short Communication

Abstract

Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on the cat brain to characterize [1-11C]hexanoate and other [1-11C]labeled short and medium-chain fatty acids as a tracer of fatty acid oxidative metabolism. After an intravenous injection the brain uptake of [1-11C]hexanoate reached a peak followed by rapid washout until 2 min (first phase). Subsequently the total brain uptake was again increased and reached to a peak 7–10 min after tracer injection (second phase). The blood radioactivity of unmetabolized [1-11C]hexanoate was rapidly decreased and almost eliminated within the first 2 min, whereas the blood radioactivity of [11C]CO2/HCO3 was gradually increased and reached a peak approximately 5 min after tracer injection. As the effect of circulating [11C]CO2/ HCO3 was examined by a bolus intravenous injection of [11C]CO2/HCO3 , the brain uptake of [11C]CO2/HCO3 was rapidly increased right after the injection and changed parallel to the blood level of [11C]CO2/HCO3 .

These results suggest that, in contrast to the previous mouse data, the time-activity curve in the cat brain following intravenous injection of [l-11C]hexanoate has a biphasic pattern, the second phase being determined by peripherally originating [11C]CO2/HCO3 , and therefore does not reflect the metabolism of11C-labeled fatty acid in the brain.

Key words

hexanoate fatty acid brain cats PET 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yojiro Sakiyama
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kiichi Ishiwata
    • 1
  • Kenji Ishii
    • 1
  • Keiichi Oda
    • 1
  • Hinako Toyama
    • 1
  • Shin-ichi Ishii
    • 1
  • Hitomi Nakayama
    • 2
  • Akio Sato
    • 2
  • Michio Senda
    • 1
  1. 1.Positron Medical CenterTokyo Metropolitan Institute of GerontologyTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of the Autonomic Nervous SystemTokyo Metropolitan Institute of GerontologyJapan

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