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Journal of Medical Toxicology

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 46–49 | Cite as

Medical toxicology and public health—update on research and activities at the centers for disease control and prevention, and the agency for toxic substances and disease registry: Introduction to the Laboratory Response Network-Chemical (LRN-C)

  • Carl Skinner
  • Jerry Thomas
  • Rudolph Johnson
  • Robert Kobelski
The CDC TOX Report

Summary

Medical toxicologists and PCCs should understand the operation of local, state, and federal public health infrastructure; the capabilities of laboratories used; and recognize their own roles as a vital component of public health response. Phone numbers for local health departments should be readily available in EDs and PCCs. PCC staff should also be aware of the LRN-C and its sampling and shipping procedures, as they might be contacted before public health officials or locally based medical toxicologists for guidance. CDC staff, including medical toxicologists, provides multiple educational activities and programs to improve the knowledge of EMs regarding the capabilities of the LRN-C.

Keywords

Sulfur Mustard Chemical Warfare Agent Local Health Department Public Health Response Medical Toxicology Volume 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© American College of Medical Toxicology 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl Skinner
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jerry Thomas
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Rudolph Johnson
    • 1
  • Robert Kobelski
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Laboratory SciencesNational Center for Environmental Health (NCEH)Atlanta
  2. 2.Department of Emergency Medicine, Section of ToxicologyEmory University School of MedicineAtlanta
  3. 3.Emory/CDC Medical Toxicology FellowshipAtlanta
  4. 4.Georgia Poison Control CenterAtlanta

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