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Wetlands

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 298–304 | Cite as

Effects of temperature, stratification, scarification, and seed origin on the germination ofScirpus acutus Muhl. seeds for use in constructed wetlands

  • Joan S. Thullen
  • Debra R. Eberts
Article

Abstract

Procedures to maximize seed germination ofScirpus acutus (hardstem bulrush) from two geographic locations were studied in the laboratory. Pregermination conditions included scarification and stratification at 4±1°C for 0, 2, 4, 8, or 12 weeks while submerged in water. Following the treatments, seeds were placed in night/day temperature regimes of 10/25°C or 18/22°C under a 14-hour photoperiod (≈200 μmol m−2 s−1 PPFD). A stratification period of at least 2 weeks significantly enhanced germination. Germination was significantly greater at 10/25°C than at 18/22°C. Maximum germination percentages of 97.5 and 92.5 were achieved for seed lots exposed to a 10/25°C temperature regime following a 12-week cold period. Germination percentages of seeds from the two geographic locations did not differ significantly (P <0.05).

Key Words

Seed germination Scirpus acutus hardstem bulrush cold stratification constructed wetlands marshes 

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Copyright information

© Society of Wetland Scientists 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joan S. Thullen
    • 1
  • Debra R. Eberts
    • 2
  1. 1.National Biological ServiceDenver
  2. 2.Bureau of ReclamationDenver

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