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Wetlands

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 105–117 | Cite as

Vegetative erosion control in an oligohaline environment Currituck Sound, North Carolina

  • C. S. Benner
  • P. L. Knutson
  • R. A. Brochu
  • A. K. Hurme
Article

Abstract

Research on erosion control with vegetation by the Coastal Engineering Research Center (CERC) demonstrated that salt marsh plantings help dissipate wave energy causing deposition of sediments. These processes can convert eroding environments into depositional environments producing shore advancement. To evaluate the impact of shoreline plantings in oligohaline coastal environments, a 30 meter segment of a planting was monitored over an eight-year period. Within five years, erosion ceased, and at least 20 additional species of plants had invaded the study site.

Keywords

Salt Marsh Erosion Control Marsh Plant Shoreline Change Shoreline Position 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Society of Wetland Scientists 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. S. Benner
    • 1
  • P. L. Knutson
    • 1
  • R. A. Brochu
    • 1
  • A. K. Hurme
    • 1
  1. 1.Coastal Engineering Research CenterFort Belvoir

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