Advertisement

Striato-pallidal influence on food intake, body weight and locomotor activity

  • S. Dua-Sharma
  • Edwin R. Smutz
  • K. N. Sharma
  • H. L. Jacobs
Article
  • 7 Downloads

Abstract

The food and water intake, body weight, and locomotor activity (wheel runs) were studied before and after stereotaxic electrolytic lesions at different planes of caudate nuclei of adult male and female albino rats. Lesions of lateral preoptic area, medial forebrain bundle and marginal regions of globi pallidi led to aphagia and adipsia lasting for 8–38 days. Locomotor activity, however, remained normal and there was no motor deficit. There was significant increase in wheel running (100%–450%), after tiny lesions in the anterior part of caudate nucleus (A 8·6) whereas marked drop (50–90%) in daily wheel running was observed with posterior lesions at A 7·6. Increase in body weight (30–35%) and food and water intake (15–20%) without any change in locomotor activity resulted after tiny symmetrical lesions involving caudate nucleus just above the globus pallidus (A 7·4). Lesions involving nucleus accumbens, medial preoptic area and ventromedio-marginal part of caudate nucleus, however led to 10–25% decrease in body weight in spite of 30–35% increase in food intake. The results suggest a differential striato-pallidal regulation of food and water intake, body weight and activity.

Keywords

Food Intake Water Intake Locomotor Activity Caudate Nucleus Globus Pallidus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Morgane, P. J.,Am. J. Physiol. 201 420 (1961).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Wang, G. H. and Akert, K.,Arch. Ital. Biol. 100 48 (1962).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Gold, R. M.,Physiol. Behav. 2 211 (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Levine, N. S., Ferguson, N., Kreinick, C. J., Gustafson, J. W. and Schwartzbaum, J. S.,J. Comp. Physiol. Psychol. 77 282 (1971).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Sharma, K. N., InChemical Senses and Nutrition. [(Eds.) (M. Kare, and O. Maller], Johns Hopkins Press, 281 (1967).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Sharma, K. N. and Dua, S.,The Physiologist 6 273 (1963).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Rubinstein, E. H. and Delgado, J. M. R.,Am. J. Physiol. 205 941 (1963).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Richter, C. P.,Comp. Psychol. Monogr. 1 1 (1922–23).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Strong, P. N. Jr.,J. Comp. Physiol. Psychol. 50 596 (1957).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Shirley, M.,Psychol. Bull. 26 341 (1929).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Baumeister, A., Hawkins, W. F. and Cromwell, R. L.,Psychol. Bull. 61 438 (1964).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Kennedy, G. C.,Proc. Nutr. Soc. 20 58 (1961).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Degroot, J.,Verh. Kon. Ned. Acad. Wetensch. A. Natuurk. 52 1 (1959).Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Teitelbaum, P. and Epstein, A. N.,Psychol. Rev. 69 74 (1962).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Almli, C. R. and Weiss, G. S.,Physiol. Behav. 13 527 (1974).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Anand, B. K. and Brobeck, J. R.,Yale J. Biol. Med. 25 123 (1951).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Montemurro, D. G. and Stevenson, J. A. F.,Yale J. Biol. Med. 28 396 (1955).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Teitelbaum, P., InProgress in Physiological Psychology. (Eds) E. Steller, and J. M. Sprague 1, Vol. 4, New York Academic Press (1971).Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Ungerstedt, U.,Acta Physiol. Scand. Suppl. 367 1 (1971).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Ungerstedt, U.,Acta Physiol. Scand. Suppl. 367 95 (1971).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Brobeck, J. R., Tepperman, J. and Long, C. N. H.,Yale J. Biol. Med. 15 831 (1943).Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Kennedy, G. C.,Proc. Roy. Soc. B 140 578 (1953).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Rabin, B. M. and Smith, C. J.,Physiol. Behav. 3 417 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Rabin, B. M.,Physiol. Behav. 13 769 (1974).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Liles, S. L. and Davis, G. D.,Science.164 195 (1969).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Whittier, J. R. and Orr, H.,Neurology.12 529 (1962).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Neill, D. E. and Grossman, S. P.,J. Comp. Physiol. Psychol. 71 311 (1970).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Neill, D. E., Rose, J. F. and Grossman, S. P.,Physiol. Behav. 13 297 (1974).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Winocur, G. and Mills, J. A.,J. Comp. Physiol. Psychol. 68 552 (1969).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Winocur, G.,J. Comp. Physiol. Psychol. 86 432 (1974).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Divac, I., Rosvold, H. E. and Szwarobart, M. K.,J. Comp. Physiol. Psychol. 63 184 (1967).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Hull, C. D., Buchwald, N. A. and Ling, G. M.,Brain Research 6 22 (1967).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Dua-Sharma
    • 1
    • 2
  • Edwin R. Smutz
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • K. N. Sharma
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. L. Jacobs
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologySt. John’s Medical CollegeBangalore
  2. 2.Food Sciences LaboratoryU.S. Army Natick Development CentreNatickUSA
  3. 3.U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioural and Social Sciences, Field UnitHQ TCATA (PERI-OH)Fort HoodUSA

Personalised recommendations