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New Generation Computing

, Volume 6, Issue 2–3, pp 309–354 | Cite as

Annotated bibliography on partial evaluation and mixed computation

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Keywords

Logic Program Partial Evaluation Program Transformation Annotate Bibliography Denotational Semantic 
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References

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