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Biological Trace Element Research

, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 125–131 | Cite as

Effects of three chelating agents, EDTA, NTA, and TPP, on the concentration of elements in rat tissues

  • N. Krari
  • P. Allain
Article

Abstract

Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and tripolyphosphate (TPP) sodium salts were given orally to rats at the dose of 1 mmol/kg/d for 35 d.

The concentrations of Na, K, Ca, Mg, P, S, Fe, Sr, Cu, and Zn were determined in blood, plasma, brain, heart, muscle, liver, kidney, duodenum, and bone of control rats and of the rats receiving EDTA, NTA, and TPP.

The main effect induced by EDTA, NTA, and TPP was a decrease of the concentrations of several elements Ca, Mg, Fe, P in the duodenum. Otherwise, EDTA induced an increase of Zn in the kidney (+20%), NTA, an increase of Fe in liver (+29%), and particularly an increase of Zn in bone (+44%). TPP induced a slight decrease of Zn and Cu in liver.

In conclusion, EDTA, NTA, and TPP taken orally at the dose of 1 mmol/kg/d for 35 d induced moderate changes of the concentrations of some elements in rat tissues, but without signs of toxicity.

Index Entries

EDTA nitrilotriacetic acid tripolyphosphate oral administration elements tissues rats 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Krari
    • 1
  • P. Allain
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de PharmacologieCentre Hospitalier UniversitaireAngers CedexFrance

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