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Intereconomics

, Volume 38, Issue 3, pp 156–164 | Cite as

Territorial disparities in Europe

  • Annekatrin Niebuhr
  • Silvia Stiller
Economic Trends

Abstract

Traditionally, EU policies have been focused on economic and social cohesion. Recently, the territorial dimension of regional disparities as an aspect of EU policy has gained importance. The European Spatial Development Perspective (ESDP), adopted in 1999, is meant to support a balanced development of the EU territory. Moreover, the European Commission addressed issues of territorial cohesion in its latest cohesion report. The present paper deals with territorial disparities and their current development in the EU. It analyses which kinds of region develop dynamically and offer favourable labour market conditions. The differences between rural and urban areas are a fundamental feature of territorial disparities in the EU and are of essential significance for the ESDP. The analysis deals with the question whether disparities between poor and rich regions as well as different growth trends and labour market conditions are still marked by the dualism between city and countryside.

Keywords

Gross Domestic Product Capita Income Rural Region Labour Market Condition Settlement Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© HWWA and Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Annekatrin Niebuhr
    • 1
  • Silvia Stiller
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of European IntegrationHamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA)HamburgGermany

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