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Journal of Plant Biology

, Volume 51, Issue 1, pp 74–77 | Cite as

Detection of gene flow from GM to non-GM watermelon in a field trial

  • Chang-Gi Kim
  • Bumkyu Lee
  • Dae In Kim
  • Ji Eun Park
  • Hyo-Jeong Kim
  • Kee Woong Park
  • Hoonbok Yi
  • Soon-Chun Jeong
  • Won Kee Yoon
  • Chee Hark Harn
  • Hwan Mook Kim
Article

Abstract

Gene flow from genetically modified (GM) crops to conventional non-GM crops is a serious concern for protection of conventional and organic farming. Gene flow from GM watermelon developed for rootstock use, containing cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV)-coat protein (CP) gene, to a non-GM isogenic control variety “Clhalteok” and grafted watermelon “Keumcheon” was investigated in a small scale field trial as a pilot study. Hybrids between GM and non-GM watermelons were screened from 1304 “Chalteok” seeds and 856 “Keumcheon” seeds using the duplex PCR method targeting theCGMMV- CP gene as a marker. Hybrids were found in all pollen recipient plots. The gene flow frequencies were greater for “Chaiteok” than for “KeumcheonD; with 75% outcrossing in the “Chaiteok” plot at the closest distance (0.8 m) to the GM plot. A much larger scale field trial is necessary to identify the isolation distance between GM and non-GM watermelon, as the behaviors of insect pollinators needs to be clarified in Korea.

Keywords

Citrullus lanatus gene flow genetically modified crop watermelon 

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Copyright information

© The Botanical Society of Korea 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chang-Gi Kim
    • 1
  • Bumkyu Lee
    • 1
  • Dae In Kim
    • 1
  • Ji Eun Park
    • 1
  • Hyo-Jeong Kim
    • 1
  • Kee Woong Park
    • 1
  • Hoonbok Yi
    • 1
  • Soon-Chun Jeong
    • 1
  • Won Kee Yoon
    • 1
  • Chee Hark Harn
    • 2
  • Hwan Mook Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.Bio-Evaluation CenterKRIBBCheongwonKorea
  2. 2.Biotechnology InstituteNongwoo Bio Co., Ltd.YeojuKorea

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