Journal of Plant Biology

, Volume 48, Issue 3, pp 270–275 | Cite as

Interaction of sulfate assimilation with nitrate assimilation as a function of nutrient status and enzymatic co-regulation inbrassica juncea roots



The interaction of sulfate assimilation with nitrate assimilation inBrassica juncea roots was analyzed by monitoring the regulation of ATP sulfurylase (AS), adenosine-5’-phosphosulfate reductase (AR), sulfite reductase (SiR), and nitrite reductase (NiR). Depending on the status of sulfur and nitrogen nutrition, AS and AR activities and mRNA levels were increased by sulfate starvation but decreased by nitrate starvation. The activation of AS and AR by sulfate starvation was inhibited by sulfate/nitrate starvation. However, the rise in steady-state mRNA levels for AS and AR by sulfate starvation was not affected by sulfate/nitrate starvation. SiR gene expression was slightly activated by both sulfate starvation and sulfate/nitrate starvation, but was decreased by nitrate starvation. Although NiR gene expression was little affected by sulfate starvation, it was diminished significantly by either nitrate or nitrate/sulfate starvation. Cysteine (Cys) also decreased AS and AR activities and mRNA levels even when plants were simultaneously starved for sulfate; in contrast, both SiR and NiR gene expressions were only slightly, if at all, affected under the same conditions. This supports our conclusion that Cys, the end-product of sulfate assimilation, is the key regulatory signal. Moreover, SiR and NiR apparently are not the linking step in the co-regulation of sulfate and nitrate assimilation in plants.


APS reductase ATP sulfurylase cysteine nitrite reductase sulfite reductase 


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Copyright information

© The Botanical Society of Korea 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Agricultural Chemistry, Division of Applied Biology and ChemistryKyungpook National UniversityDaeguKorea
  2. 2.School of Life Science and Biotechnology, College of Natural SciencesKyungpook National UniversityDaeguKorea

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