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Making sense of census data: A components analysis of employment change among indigenous Australians

  • John Taylor
  • Martin Bell
Article

Abstract

The 1996 Census count of indigenous Australians included a substantial number of individuals who were not recorded as indigenous by the previous census. This paper considers the implications of this for interpreting change in employment numbers. Two adjustments are made to employment change data. First, reverse survival of the 1996 population is applied to reconstruct 1991 employment figures. Second, administrative data are used to discount employment generated by participation in labour market programs. The effect is to substantially deflate the strong intercensal employment growth apparent from census counts with the conclusion that the rate of indigenous employment in the mainstream labour market has fallen.

Keywords

Indigenous People Employment Growth Employment Change Labour Force Status Census Count 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Taylor
    • 1
  • Martin Bell
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy ResearchThe Australian National UniversityCanberra
  2. 2.Department of Geographical and Environmental StudiesThe University of AdelaideAdelaide

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