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Journal of the Australian Population Association

, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 164–177 | Cite as

Ex-Nuptial Births and Unmarried Cohabitation in Australia

  • Siew-Ean Khoo
  • Peter McDonald
Article
  • 28 Downloads

Summary

An increase in the number of ex-nuptial births over the last ten years appears to be related to the increase in the number of de facto couples. De facto couples with ex-nuptial births are frequently of lower socio-economic status than couples with nuptial births although they do not differ from married couples in their attitudes to marriage and having children. We argue that uncertain economic circumstances make some couples hesitate to marry; instead they decide to live in de facto relationships in which unplanned pregnancies occur.

Keywords

Married Couple Total Fertility Rate Australian Bureau Unplanned Pregnancy Family Allowance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Siew-Ean Khoo
    • 1
  • Peter McDonald
    • 2
  1. 1.Australian Bureau of StatisticsAdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.Australian Institute of Family StudiesMelbourneAustralia

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