Advertisement

Asia Pacific Education Review

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 374–385 | Cite as

Empirical manifestations of power among adult learners in online discussions

  • JuSung Jun
Article

Abstract

This study examined the nature of power manifestations in a specific online learning setting. The two online classes selected for this study were Master’s level courses in a professional school at a large state university in the United States. A total of 1340 postings were made in the two classes over the span of the semester. To test the research question, frequency analysis and the Mann-Whitney U test were conducted, using gender and race as the independent variables. The results of the study suggest the possibility that the online discussion environment attenuates the power of gender-based privilege and perhaps undercuts race privilege, even though there was an element of inequality based on power between the racial groups in an indication of power manifestations.

Key words

manifestations of power critical discourse analysis powerful/powerless language 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Brookfield, S. D. (2001). A political analysis of discussion groups: Can the circle be unbroken? In R. M. Cervero., A. L. Wilson., & Associates,Power in practice: The struggle for knowledge and power in society (pp. 206- 225). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  2. Brookfield, S. D. (2000). The concept of critically reflective practice. In A. L. Wilson, & E. R. Hayes (Eds.),Handbook of adult and continuing education (pp. 33- 53). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  3. Carli, L. L. (1990). Interpersonal relations and group processes.Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 59(5), 941–951.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Cunningham, P. M. (2000). A sociology of adult education. In A. L. Wilson & E. R. Hayes (Eds.),Handbook of adult and continuing education (pp. 573–591). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  5. Dellinger, B. (1995).Critical discourse analysis. Retrieved August 11, 2002, from http://users.utu.fi/bredelli/ cda.htmlGoogle Scholar
  6. Dovidio, J. F., Ellyson, S. L., Keating, C. F., Heltman, K., & Brown, C. (1988). The relationship of social power to visual displays of dominance between men and women.Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 54, 233–242.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Fahy, P. J. (2002). Use of linguistic qualifiers and intensifiers in a computer conference.The American Journal of Distance Education, 16(1), 5–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Fairclough, N. (1995).Critical discourse analysis: The critical study of language. London/New York: Longman.Google Scholar
  9. Fairclough, N., & Wodak, R. (1997). Critical discourse analysis. In T. A. van Dijk (Ed.),Discourse as social interaction (pp. 258–284). London: Sage.Google Scholar
  10. Grob, L. M., Meyers, R. A., & Schuh, R. (1997). Powerful/powerless language use in group interactions: Sex differences or similarities?Communication Quarterly, 45(3), 282–303.Google Scholar
  11. Hart, M. (2001). Transforming boundaries of power in the classroom: Learning fromLa Mestiza. In R. M. Cervero., A. L. Wilson., & Associates,Power in practice: The struggle for knowledge and power in society (pp. 164–183). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  12. Jeris, L. (2001).Comparison of power relations within electronic and face-to-face classroom discussions: A case study. Paper presented at the 42th annual Adult Education Research Conference. East Lansing, MI. Retrieved November 1, 2002, from http://www. edst.educ.ubc.ca/aerc/2001/2001wilson.htmGoogle Scholar
  13. Joyce, S. (2001). The creation of bent knowledge: How lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth negotiate and reconfigure homophobic and heterosexist discourse.Information Research, 6(2). Retrieved from http:// InformationR.net/ir/6-2/ws4.htmlGoogle Scholar
  14. Jun, J., & Park, J. (2003). Power relations within online discussion context: Based on adult international students’ perspective and their participation in the learning context. In D. Flowers, A. Jalipa, M. Lee, E. Lopez, A. Schelstrate, & V. Sheared (Eds.),Proceedings of the 44th annual Adult Education Research Conference (AERC) (pp. 193–198). San Francisco: San Francisco State University.Google Scholar
  15. Kollock, P., Blumstein, P., & Schwartz, P. (1985). Sex and power in interaction: Conventional privilege and duties.American Sociological Review, 50, 34–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. McAllister, C., & Ting, E. (2001).Analysis of discussion items by males and females in online college courses. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Seattle, WA. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED458237).Google Scholar
  17. Tisdell, E. J. (1993). Interlocking systems of power, privilege, and oppression in adult higher education classes.Adult Education Quarterly, 43(4), 204–226.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. van Dijk, T. A. (1998).Critical discourse analysis. Retrieved October 11, 2002, from http://www. let.uva.nl/~teun/cda.htmGoogle Scholar
  19. van Dijk, T. A. (1996). Discourse, power and access. In C. R. Caldas-Coulthard & M. Coulthard (Eds.),Text and practices (pp. 84–104). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  20. vanDijk, T. A. (1993). Principles of critical discourse analysis.Discourse & Society, 4(2), 249–283.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Williams, S. W., Watkins, K., Daley, B., Courtenay, B., Davis, M., & Dymock, D. (2001).Facilitating cross cultural online discussion groups: Issues and challenges. Paper presented at the 42th annual Adult Education Research Conference. East Lansing, Michigan. Retrieved November 1, 2002, from http://www.edst.educ.ubc.ca/aerc/2001/2001wilson.htmGoogle Scholar
  22. Wilson, A. L., & Cervero, R. M. (2001).Adult education and the struggle for knowledge and power: Practical action in a critical tradition. Paper presented at the 42nd annual Adult Education Research Conference. East Lansing, MI. Retrieved November 1, 2002, from http://www.edst.educ.ubc.ca/aerc/2001/2001wilson.htmGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Education Research Institute 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Kyungwon UniversityKyunggi-DoKorea

Personalised recommendations