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Resource constraint mapping and management in arid tract of Punjab

  • V. K. Verma
  • Anil Sood
  • P. K. Sharma
  • Charanjit Singh
  • M. L. Manchanda
Article
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Abstract

The arid tract of Punjab experiences various problems like thick sand cover (sand dunes) in large area, poor retention of water and nutrients in coarse textured soils, soil salinity and/or alkalinity, water logging and poor ground water quality. In the present study multidate remotely sensed data both in the form of aerial photographs and satellite imagery on 1:50,000 scale were interpreted visually to map physiography and soils. The ground water samples from tubewells distributed all over the area were collected and analysed to prepare ground water quality map. The soil and ground water quality maps were integrated to produce a resource constraint map of the area showing physical, chemical and hydrological constraints. The study revealed that alluvial plain suffers from hydrological constraints due to marginal to.poor ground water in 86% of the total area. The sand dunes show both physical and hydrological constraints due to coarse textured (sandy) soils and brackish ground water. The basins having soil salinity and brackish ground water cover 0.10% of the area. Keeping in view the type of constraint, locale specific measures like levelling and stabilisation of sand dunes, reclamation of salt affected and water logged areas followed by plantation of tree species which act as biopumps are suggested. The conjuctive use of surface (canal) and ground water is essential to prevent secondary salinization and sodification. The study demonstrates the potential usefulness of remote sensing technology in mapping natural resources and assess the nature, magnitude and spatial distribution of resource constraints.

Keywords

Ground Water Sand Dune Alluvial Plain Exchangeable Sodium Percentage Ground Water Quality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. K. Verma
    • 1
  • Anil Sood
    • 1
  • P. K. Sharma
    • 1
  • Charanjit Singh
    • 1
  • M. L. Manchanda
    • 2
  1. 1.Punjab Remote Sensing CentreLudhiana
  2. 2.Regional Remote Sensing Service CentreISRODehradun

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