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Canadian Journal of Anesthesia

, 50:1035 | Cite as

Best evidence in anesthetic practice Prevention: Magnesium sulfate reduces the risk of eclampsia in women with pre-eclampsia

  • Joanne Douglas
  • Alison Macarthur
Obstetrical and Pediatric Anesthesia

Keywords

Nimodipine Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Magnesium Sulfate Eclampsia Neonatal Morbidity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    The Eclampsia Trial Collaborative Group. Which anticonvulsant for women with eclampsia? Evidence from the collaborative eclampsia trial. Lancet 1995; 345: 1455–63.Google Scholar
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    Belfort MA, Saade GR, Yared M, et al. Change in estimated cerebral perfusion pressure after treatment with nimodipine or magnesium sulfate in patients with preeclampsia. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1999; 181: 402–7.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    The Magpie Trial Collaborative Group. Do women with pre-eclampsia, and their babies, benefit from magnesium sulphate? The Magpie Trial: a randomised placebocontrolled trial. Lancet 2002; 359: 1877–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Belfort MA, Anthony J, Saade GR, Allen JC Jr, for the Nimodipine Study Group. A comparison of magnesium sulfate and nimodipine for the prevention of eclampsia. N Engl J Med 2003; 348: 304–11.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Magpie Trial Collaborative Group. Do women with pre-eclampsia, and their babies, benefit from magnesium sulphate? The Magpie Trial: a randomised placebo-controlled trial. Lancet 2002; 359: 1877–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Belfort MA, Anthony J, Saade GR, Allen JC Jr, for the Nimodipine Study Group. A comparison of magnesium sulfate and nimodipine for the prevention of eclampsia. N Engl J Med 2003; 348: 304–11.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Jadad AR, Moore RA, Carroll D, et al. Assessing the quality of reports of randomized clinical trials: is blinding necessary? Control Clin Trials 1996; 17: 1–12.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Belfort MA, Saade GR, Yared M, et al. Change in estimated cerebral perfusion pressure after treatment with nimodipine or magnesium sulfate in patients with preeclampsia. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1999; 181: 402–7.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Choi JC, Toon KB, Um DJ, Kim C, Kim JS, Lee SG. Intravenous magnesium sulfate administration reduces propofol infusion requirements during maintenance of propofol-N2O anesthesia. Part I: comparing propofol requirements according to hemodynamic responses. Part II: comparing bispectral index in control and magnesium groups. Anesthesiology 2002; 97: 1137–41.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Maehama T, Izena H, Kanazawa K. Management of autonomic hyperreflexia with magnesium sulfate during labor in a woman with spinal cord injury. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2000; 183: 492–3.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Dubé L, Granry JC. The therapeutic use of magnesium in anesthesiology, intensive care and emergency medicine: a review. Can J Anesth 2003; 50: 732–46.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Canadian Anesthesiologists 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joanne Douglas
    • 1
  • Alison Macarthur
    • 1
  1. 1.Toronto

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