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Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia

, Volume 39, Supplement 1, pp R60–R70 | Cite as

Anaesthetic management of the child with congenital heart disease for non-cardiac surgery

  • Frederick A. Burrows
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Conclusion

Most children with congenital heart disease can be man-aged safely if the pathophysiology of their lesion and the anaesthetic implications are understood. However, recent reviews of anaesthetic morbidity reveal a high incidence of anaesthetic-related adverse events in children with congenital heart disease.

Keywords

Congenital Heart Disease Infective Endocarditis Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Coronary Perfusion Pressure Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Conduite de l’anesthésie pour la chirurgie non-cardiaque chez l’enfant porteur de maladie cardiaque congénitale

Conclusion

La conduite de l’anesthésie sera sécuritaire chez la plupart des enfants avec maladie cardiaque congénitale si l’on comprend bien la physiopathologie de leurs lésions et les implications anesthésiques inhérentes.5 Cependant, des revues récentes de la morbidité liée à 1’anesthésie montrent une incidence élevée des complications reliées à l’anesthésie chez les enfants avec maladie cardiaque congé-nitale.6,7

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Copyright information

© Canadian Anesthesiologists 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick A. Burrows
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Anaesthesia and Paediatrics (Division of Cardiology), The Hospital for Sick ChildrenUniversity of TorontoToronto

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