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Plasma glucose and insulin levels in monkeys anticipating feeding

  • Benjamin H. Natelson
  • Peter E. Stokes
  • Allan W. Root
Article

Abstract

To see whether plasma glucose or insulin changed in anticipation of feeding, we provided seven rhesus monkeys with four-hour access to food every other day. Blood was sampled before and during a 30-minute signal which ended with food availability and before and during a 30-minute signal which was not closely and reliably linked with food availability. Plasma insulin showed no evidence of conditioning. Plasma glucose was higher during the signal than prior to the signal in both experiments. This probably reflects the arousing nature of the signal rather than appetitive-associated learning. However, the differences, while statistically significant, were probably biologically trivial because they fall within the normal fluctuations of meal-fed monkeys. Under the conditions of this experiment, it appears that conditional changes in glucose and insulin do not reliably occur in monkeys anticipating access to food.

Keywords

Plasma Glucose Plasma Glucose Level Plasma Insulin Level Control Session Tone Onset 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin H. Natelson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Peter E. Stokes
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Allan W. Root
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Primate Neuro-behavioral Unit Veterans Administration Medical Center, Department of NeurosciencesNew Jersey Medical SchoolEast Orange
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryCornell University Medical CollegeNew York
  3. 3.All Children’s Hospital and Department of PediatricsUniversity of South Florida College of MedicineTampa

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