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The change in O3, SO2 and NO2 concentrations in Lithuania

  • Rasa Girgzdiene
  • Dalia Sopauskiene
  • Aloyzas Girgzdys
Review Articles

Abstract

Due to the dynamic nature of the atmosphere, substantial amounts of gaseous and particulate pollutants are transported to the areas distant from their sources. In order to determine the regional concentration levels of atmospheric pollutants in Lithuania, concentrations of gaseous O3, SO2, NO2 and other pollutants have been measured at the Preila background station (55°20′ N and 21°00′ E, 5 m a.s.l.) since 1981. The long-term concentration data set enabled us to get temporal trends, both on a seasonal and longer time scale, to identify source areas of pollutants and to relate them to the emission data. Based on the data obtained, the different tendencies in the pollutant concentration changes were revealed. Positive trends for ozone (of 2.9% per year during 1983–2000) and a distinct negative trend for both sulphur dioxide (of 3.8% per year during 1981–2000) and nitrogen dioxide (of 3.8% per year during 1983–2000) were found. The air mass back-trajectory analysis was used to assess the source region of air pollutants transported to Lithuania. The pollutant concentration levels were compared with their emission changes in Europe and Lithuania. The general trends in SO2 as well as in NO2 concentrations observed are consistent with changes in SO2 and NO2 emissions in Europe and Lithuania.

Keywords

Atmosphere pollutant emissions Lithuania nitrogen dioxide (NO2ozone Preila station sulphur dioxide (SO2

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Copyright information

© Ecomed Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rasa Girgzdiene
    • 1
  • Dalia Sopauskiene
    • 1
  • Aloyzas Girgzdys
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of PhysicsVilniusLithuania

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