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Economic Botany

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 307–375 | Cite as

The search for plant precursors of cortisone

  • D. S. Correll
  • B. G. Schubert
  • H. S. Gentry
  • W. O. Hawley
Article

Abstract

The subterranean tubers of Mexican yams have superseded the seed of African Strophanthus vines as the most promising vegetable source of components commercially convertible into cortisone. This arthritis-combatting drug is still manufactured primarily from bile acids of cattle, but intense efforts are being made to find suitable plant sources. In this article four of the U. S. Government scientists engaged in this work describe what is being done in this direction under Federal auspices.

Keywords

Bile Acid Sweet Potato Economic Botany Cortisone Plant Introduction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bibliography

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III. Public Patents Resulting from Our Cooperative Project on Steroidal Sapogenins

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Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 1955

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. S. Correll
    • 1
  • B. G. Schubert
    • 1
  • H. S. Gentry
    • 1
  • W. O. Hawley
    • 1
  1. 1.Horticultural Crops Research Branch, Agricultural Research ServiceU.S.D.A.USA

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