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Archives of Pharmacal Research

, Volume 30, Issue 5, pp 659–664 | Cite as

Comparison of several polysaccharide-derived chiral stationary phases for the enantiomer separation ofN-fluorenylmethoxy-carbonyl α-amino acids by hplc

  • Jing Yu Jin
  • Kyung-Ah Lee
  • Jong Seong Kang
  • Young Koo Kang
  • Chae-Sun Baek
  • Wonjae Lee
Articles Drug Efficacy

Abstract

The liquid chromatographic enantiomer separation ofN-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (FMOC) protected α-amino acids was performed on nine polysaccharide-derived chiral stationary phases (CSPs). The cellulose derived coated CSPs, Chiralcel OD-H (separation factor = 1.09– 2.70) and Chiralcel OD (separation factor = 1.08–2.55), had the best performance of all the CSPs for resolution ofN-FMOC α-amino acids and therefore, all analyte enantiomers were base-line separated on Chiralcel OD-H and/or Chiralcel OD. Enantioseparation on cellulose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) derived CSPs (Chiralcel OD-H, Chiralcel OD and Chiralpak IB) is generally greater than that on amylose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) derived CSPs (Chiralpak AD-RH, Chiralpak AD and Chiralpak IA). Additionally, coated type CSPs (Chiralcel OD-H or Chiralcel OD, and Chiralpak AD) generally provided better enantioseparation for these analytes than the covalently bonded type CSPs (Chiralpak IB and Chiralpak IA) with the same chiral selector of cellulose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) and amylose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate), respectively. However, Chiralpak IB and Chiralpak IA had an advantage over the coated type CSPs in that a broader range of solvents could be used due to its covalently bonded nature.

Key words

Chiral stationary phase Enantiomer separation N-Fluorenylmethoxy-carbonyl α-amino acids 

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Copyright information

© The Pharmaceutical Society of Korea 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jing Yu Jin
    • 1
  • Kyung-Ah Lee
    • 2
  • Jong Seong Kang
    • 2
  • Young Koo Kang
    • 3
  • Chae-Sun Baek
    • 1
  • Wonjae Lee
    • 1
  1. 1.College of PharmacyChosun UniversityGwangjuKorea
  2. 2.College of PharmacyChungnam National UniversityDaejeonKorea
  3. 3.Department of Food & DrugChosun UniversityGwangjuKorea

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