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Archives of Pharmacal Research

, Volume 25, Issue 6, pp 856–859 | Cite as

Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors from the roots ofangelica dahurica

  • Dae Keun Kim
  • Jong Pil Lim
  • Jae Heon Yang
  • Dong Ok Eom
  • Jae Soon Eun
  • Kang Hyun Leem
Research Articles Article

Abstract

In the course of finding Korean natural products for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity, we found that a methanolic extract of the roots ofAngelica dahurica showed significant inhibitory effects on AChE. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanolic extract resulted in the isolation of three furanocoumarins, isoimperatorin (1), imperatorin (2) and oxypeucedanin (3), as active principles. These compounds inhibited AChE activity in a dose-dependent manner, and the IC50 values of compounds1–3 were 74.6, 63.7 and 89.1 uM, respectively.

Key words

Angelica dahurica Anticholinesterase activity Isoimperatorin Imperatorin Oxypeucedanin 

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Copyright information

© The Pharmaceutical Society of Korea 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dae Keun Kim
    • 1
  • Jong Pil Lim
    • 1
  • Jae Heon Yang
    • 1
  • Dong Ok Eom
    • 1
  • Jae Soon Eun
    • 1
  • Kang Hyun Leem
    • 1
  1. 1.College of PharmacyWoosuk UniversitySamryeKorea

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