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Archives of Pharmacal Research

, Volume 21, Issue 5, pp 576–580 | Cite as

Degradation of acharan sulfate and heparin byBacteroides stercoris HJ-15, a human intestinal bacterium

  • Dong-Hyun Kim
  • Byung-Taek Kim
  • Sun-Yong Park
  • Na-Young Kim
  • Myung Joo Han
  • Kuk-Hyun Shin
  • Wan-Suk Kim
  • Yeong-Sik Kim
Research Articles

Abstract

When glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-degrading enzymes were measured in normal human stool suspensions, all 5 tested different stools degraded titrable heparin and acharan sulfate. GAG-degrading bacteria were screened from the isolates of human stools. Among them, HJ-15 had the most potent activities of heparinases (GAGs-degrading enzymes). However, HJ-15 produced the enzyme even if in the media without heparin. Acharan sulfate lyase was induced by acharan sulfate and heparin. Heparinase production was also induced by these GAGs. These enzymes, acharan sulfate lyase and heparinase, were produced in exponential and stationary phase of HJ-15 growth, respectively. Optimal pHs of the acharan sulfate lyase and heparinase activities were 7.2 and 7.5, respectively. The biochemical properties of HJ-15 was similar to those ofB. stercoris. However, difference fromB. stercoris was utilization of raffinose. This HJ-15 also degraded chondroitin sulfates A and C.

Key words

Acharan sulfate Heparin Intestinal microflora Acharan sulfate lyase Bacteroides stercoris HJ-15 

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Copyright information

© The Pharmaceutical Society of Korea 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dong-Hyun Kim
    • 1
  • Byung-Taek Kim
    • 1
  • Sun-Yong Park
    • 1
  • Na-Young Kim
    • 2
  • Myung Joo Han
    • 2
  • Kuk-Hyun Shin
    • 3
  • Wan-Suk Kim
    • 3
  • Yeong-Sik Kim
    • 3
  1. 1.College of PharmacyKyung Hee UniversitySeoulKorea
  2. 2.Department of Food and NutritionKyung Hee UniversitySeoulKorea
  3. 3.Natural Products Research InstituteSeoul National UniversitySeoulKorea

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