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Breast Cancer

, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp 67–75 | Cite as

Dietary fat and breast cancer: A controversial issue

  • Masakuni Noguchi
  • Takao Taniya
  • Takeo Kumaki
  • Nagayoshi Ohta
  • Hirohisa Kitagawa
  • Kazuo Kinoshita
  • Mitsuharu Earashi
  • Ryo Yagasaki
  • Masahide Minami
  • Futoshi Kawahara
  • Hiroshi Tsuyama
  • Koichi Miwa
Article

Key words

Breast cancer Dietary fat Polyunsaturated fat Eicosapentaenoic acid Docosahexaenoic acid 

Abbreviations

PUFAs

Polyunsaturated fatty acids

DMBA

7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene

EPA

Eicosapentaenoic acid

DHA

Docosahexaenoic acid

NMU

N-Nitrosomethylurea

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Breast Cancer Society 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masakuni Noguchi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Takao Taniya
    • 2
  • Takeo Kumaki
    • 2
  • Nagayoshi Ohta
    • 2
  • Hirohisa Kitagawa
    • 2
  • Kazuo Kinoshita
    • 2
  • Mitsuharu Earashi
    • 2
  • Ryo Yagasaki
    • 2
  • Masahide Minami
    • 2
  • Futoshi Kawahara
    • 2
  • Hiroshi Tsuyama
    • 2
  • Koichi Miwa
    • 2
  1. 1.Operation CenterKanazawa University HospitalKanazawaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Surgery (II)Kanazawa University HospitalKanazawaJapan

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