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Contemporary Jewry

, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp 3–8 | Cite as

An approach to the components and consequences of Jewish identification

  • Bernard Lazerwitz
Article

Conclusion

For this national Jewish sample, socioeconomic factors do not have much of an association with religious aid ethnic factors Among the biosocial factors, neither age nor sex explain significant variance Generation and life cycle frequently are at the moderate strength level Usually, the strongest explanatory variables for the Various Jewish identity measures are other identity variables The strongest link with activity in general community organizations is through activity in Jewish community organizations

Customarily, but not here, activity in organizations is linked to social class Can general community organizational activity replace the effects of social class for these Jewish data? It Would seem so, with its positive link to Jewish organizations and its negative link to both the more private ethnic community involvement measure and the traditionally oriented denomination variable. For the latter, general community activity is highest for Reform Jews, followed by those who prefer the Conservative denomination Orthodox Jews and Jews without a denominational preference are about equally inactive The other identity measures have weak effects on general community activity

Keywords

Jewish Community Jewish Identity Contemporary JEWRY Jewish Education Jewish Organization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. ANDREWS, FRANK, JAMES MORGAN, and JOHN SONQUIST 1969 Multiple Classification Analysis Ann Arbor, Michigan Institute for Social Research, University of MichiganGoogle Scholar
  2. LAZERWITZ, BERNARD 1973a “Religious Identification and Its Ethnic Correlates A Multivariate Moctel” Social Forces 52 (December) 204–220CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  5. LAZERWITZ, BERNARD 1978 “An estimation of a Rare Population Group. The United States Jewish Population” Demography (August). 389–394 ogy, Bar-Ilan UniversityGoogle Scholar
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  8. SONQUIST, JOHN, ELIZABETH BAKER, and JAMES MORGAN 1971 Searching for Structure (Alias-AID III). Ann Arbor, Michigan: Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernard Lazerwitz
    • 1
  1. 1.Bar-Ilan UniversityIsrael

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