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Contemporary Jewry

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 60–75 | Cite as

Women’s changing place in jewish philanthropy

  • Steven J. Gold
Article

Abstract

Drawing upon in-depth interviews with 47 Jewish communal activists in Los Angeles and Detroit, this paper examines women’s involvement in Jewish philanthropy. It considers their approaches to fund-raising and the ways organizations have attempted to respond to women’s altering perspectives and needs. Findings suggest that communal organizations must continue to adapt if they are to attract a significant proportion of younger Jewish women.

Keywords

Jewish Community Jewish Identity Jewish Woman Contemporary JEWRY Fund Raising 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven J. Gold
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyMichigan Sate UniversityUSA

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