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Crustal motion of Chinese mainland monitored by GPS

  • Wenyao Zhu
  • Xiaoya Wang
  • Zongyi Cheng
  • Yongqin Xiong
  • Qiang Zhang
  • Shuhua Ye
  • Zongjin Ma
  • Junyong Chen
  • Houze Xu
  • Ziqing Wei
  • Xi’an Lai
  • Jingnan Liu
  • Biaoren Jin
  • Jinwei Ren
  • Qi Wang
Article

Abstract

To measure and monitor the crustal motion in China, a GPS network has been established with an average side length of 1 000 km and with more than 20 points on the margins of each major tectonic block and fault zone in China. Three campaigns were carried out in 1992,1994 and 1996, respectively by this network. Here we present, for the first time, the horizontal displacement rates of 22 GPS monitoring stations distributed over the whole China and global IGS stations surrounding China, based on these GPS repeated measurements. From these results by GPS, we have obtained the sketch of crustal motion in China.

Keywords

crustal motion in China GPS monitoring 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wenyao Zhu
    • 1
  • Xiaoya Wang
    • 1
  • Zongyi Cheng
    • 1
  • Yongqin Xiong
    • 1
  • Qiang Zhang
    • 1
  • Shuhua Ye
    • 1
  • Zongjin Ma
    • 2
  • Junyong Chen
    • 3
  • Houze Xu
    • 4
  • Ziqing Wei
    • 5
  • Xi’an Lai
    • 6
  • Jingnan Liu
    • 7
  • Biaoren Jin
    • 7
  • Jinwei Ren
    • 2
  • Qi Wang
    • 6
  1. 1.Shanghai Astronomical ObservatoryChinese Academy of SciencesShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Institute of GeologyState Seismological BureauBeijingChina
  3. 3.National Bureau of Surveying and MappingBeijingChina
  4. 4.Wuhan Institute of Geodesy and GeophysicsChinese Academy of SciencesWuhanChina
  5. 5.Xi’an Institute of Surveying and MappingXi’anChina
  6. 6.Institute of SeismologyState Seismological BureauWuhanChina
  7. 7.Wuhan Technical University of Surveying ang MappingWuhanChina

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