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Irish Journal of Medical Science

, Volume 152, Issue 9, pp 329–335 | Cite as

The isolated, vascularly perfused, small intestine of the rat: A useful tool for the study of absorption in nutritional deficiency

  • Dorothy McMaster
  • Linda Steel
  • Andrew H. G. Love
Article

Summary

A TECHNIQUE, of vascular perfusion is described in detail and applied to the study of glucose absorption by the isolated small intestine of rats maintained on a normal diet or a semisynthetic diet deficient in zinc. In all experiments the preparation was perfused through both the lumen and the vascular bed with medium containing 11 μmol/ml of glucose. Under the conditions where the endogenous pancreatic secretions were excluded, the intestines from the normal diet rats removed 270±17 μmol/m of gut/h from the luminal supply and 134±13 μmol/m gut/h from the vascular supply. The preparations from the zinc deprived animals removed only 186±13 μmol/m of gut/h from the luminal supply and 63±25μmol/m/h from the vascular supply. When the intestines from the normal diet rats were exposed to the glycoside Phloridzin(®) the uptake of glucose from the lumen was inhibited by 67% but this was compensated for by a 76% increase in the amount of glucose removed from the vascular supply. The intestines from the zinc deprived rats also responded to the presence of the glycoside with a decrease of 71% in the amount of glucose removed from the lumen and an increase of 51% in the amount removed from the vascular supply. Thus the potential usefulness of this technique for the study of absorption in nutritional deficiency has been demonstrated by these experiments with animals deprived of a specific dietary essential element.

Keywords

Balance Salt Solution Vascular Supply Phloridzin Vascular Perfusion Zinc Deficient Diet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dorothy McMaster
    • 1
  • Linda Steel
    • 1
  • Andrew H. G. Love
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MedicineThe Queen's University, of BelfastBelfastUK

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