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Journal of Computer Science and Technology

, Volume 19, Issue 5, pp 650–656 | Cite as

PDE surface generation with combined closed and non-closed form solutions

  • Jian-Jun ZhangEmail author
  • Li-Hua You
Article

Abstract

Partial differential equations (PDEs) combined with suitably chosen boundary conditions are effective in creating free form surfaces. In this paper, a fourth order partial differential equation and boundary conditions up to tangential continuity are introduced. The general solution is divided into a closed form solution and a non-closed form one leading to a mixed solution to the PDE. The obtained solution is applied to a number of surface modelling examples including glass shape design, vase surface creation and arbitrary surface representation.

Keywords

surface generation combined solution fourth order partial differential equation geometric modelling 

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Copyright information

© Science Press, Beijing China and Allerton Press Inc., Beijing China and Allerton Press Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Centre for Computer AnimationBournemouth UniversityU.K.

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