Advertisement

Journal of Computing in Higher Education

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 91–109 | Cite as

The evolution of online teaching and learning in engineering at deakin university

  • Stuart Palmer
  • William Tulloch
Article

Abstract

THIS PAPER PRESENTS A BRIEF HISTORY of the use of online technologies in the support of teaching and learning in the School of Engineering and Technology at Deakin University, Victoria, Australia. It addresses the following topics: flexible engineering programs at Deakin University; computer-based learning in the School of Engineering and Technology; progression from individual efforts to formal, centralized control of the World Wide Web (Web); the costs of information technology; experiences with grant funded development projects; managing the development of online material; student access and equity; and staff development and cultural change. A sustainable online content development model is proposed to carry the School’s online initiatives in support of teaching and learning activities into the future.

Keywords

engineering education computer-based learning World Wide Web information technology staff development 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Baliga, B., & Palmer, S. (1996). Use of the Internet for flexible delivery and enhancement of teaching and learning.Proceedings of AAEE96: Australasian Association for Engineering Education 8th Annual Convention and Conference (pp. 201–205). Clayton, Victoria, Australia: UNESCO Supported International Centre for Engineering Education.Google Scholar
  2. Briggs, H. (1995). Towards student-centred engineering education at Deakin University.Proceedings of ODLAA95: 12th Forum of the Open & Distance Learning Association of Australia (pp. 2–11). Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia: Division of Distance and Continuing Education, Central Queensland University.Google Scholar
  3. Elgueta, D., Martin, T., & Briggs, H. (1995). Development of a ‘Tools of Quality’ page in the World Wide Web as an aid to the teaching of statistical process control to engineering students.Proceedings of ICEDIL95: 1995 International Congress of Engineering Deans and Industry Leaders (pp. 193–197). Clayton, Victoria, Australia: UNESCO Supported International Centre for Engineering Education.Google Scholar
  4. Ferguson, C., & Wong, K.K. (1995). Issues in using computer-aided learning programs to enhance engineering teaching — A case study.Proceedings of ICEDIL95: 1995 International Congress of Engineering Deans and Industry Leaders (pp. 198–203). Clayton, Victoria, Australia: UNESCO Supported International Centre for Engineering Education.Google Scholar
  5. Green, K.C. (1996).Digital reflections: Planning your presence on the Web. [Online] Available: http://www.campuscomputing.net/archive/change/marapr96.htmlGoogle Scholar
  6. Green, K.C. (1997). Drawn to the light, burned by the flame? Money, technology and distance education.Education at a Distance, 11(5), j1-j9.Google Scholar
  7. Kress, M.E., & Hafner, A.W. (1996). Process and facilities as critical success factors in training and supporting faculty to use multimedia/computer technologies.Proceedings of ASCUE96: Association of Small Computer Users in Education Summer Conference (pp. 110–113). North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina: Association of Small Computer Users in Education.Google Scholar
  8. Lemckert, C.J., & Florance, J.R. (1997). Considerations in the design of real-time Internet mediated laboratory experiments.Proceedings of APFETE97: 1st Asia-Pacific Forum on Engineering & Technology Education (pp. 303–306). Clayton, Victoria, Australia: UNESCO Supported International Centre for Engineering Education.Google Scholar
  9. Lloyd, B., Baker, L., & Briggs, H. (1996). Off-campus articulated education in engineering at Deakin University for mature students. Proceedings of AAEE96: Australasian Association for Engineering Education 8th Annual Convention and Conference (pp. 54–59). Clayton, Victoria, Australia: UNESCO Supported International Centre for Engineering Education.Google Scholar
  10. Morrison, J.L. (1998). The role of technology in education today and tomorrow: An interview with Kenneth Green. [Online] Available: http://www.campuscomputing.net/archive/horizon/interview.htmlGoogle Scholar
  11. Palmer, S. (2000). On- and off-campus computer usage in engineering education.Computers & Education, 34(2), 141–154.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Spratt, C., Palmer, S., & Coldwell, J. (2000). Using technologies in teaching: An initiative in academic staff development.Educational Technology and Society, 3(3), 455–461.Google Scholar
  13. The Campus Computing Project. (1997).1997 national survey of information technology in higher education. [Online] Available: http://www.campuscomputing.net/summaries/1997/index.htmlGoogle Scholar
  14. The Campus Computing Project. (1999).1999 national survey of information technology in US higher education. [Online] Available: http://www.campuscomputing.net/summaries/1999/index.htmlGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart Palmer
    • 1
  • William Tulloch
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Engineering and TechnologyDeakin University GeelongVictoriaAustralia

Personalised recommendations