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Intradermal xylocaine : dobs it have a role in setting up a drip ?

  • R. B. Stephens
  • S. McClinton
  • J. Mulhall
  • A. O’Brien
  • T. P. J. Hennessy
Brief Report

Summary

To assess the value of intradermal xylocame when setting up a routine intravenous infusion, 100 consecutive patients were randomly allocated to cannula insertion with and without 0.5 c.c. of intradermal Xylocaine. No differences in patient discomfort were demonstrated. Insertion of cannulae with Xylocaine were more often unsuccessful, but when successful, infiltration was more frequent (13 vs 4, p<0.62), they lasted for a shorter time (52 vs 77 hrs, p<0.62), and were associated with greater cost than those set up without Xylocaine. Routine use of intradermal Xylocaine when setting up an intravenous infusion can not be recommended.

Keywords

Xylocaine Patient Discomfort Cephalic Vein Xylo Plast Tape 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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  2. Bannister, B. and Harvard, C. W. 1980. Setting up a drip. Procedures in Practice. Brit. Med. J. 280, 463–465.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Smith, B. 1978. Pre-operative care. I.V. techniques. Brit. J. Hosp. Med. 5, 454–456.Google Scholar
  4. Martindale. 1977. The extra pharmacopoeia 27th Edition. Ed. Ainley Wade and J. F. Reynolds. The Pharmaceutical Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. B. Stephens
    • 1
  • S. McClinton
    • 1
  • J. Mulhall
    • 1
  • A. O’Brien
    • 1
  • T. P. J. Hennessy
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Surgery, Trinity College, DublinSt. James’s HospitalDublin 8

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