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Irish Journal of Medical Science

, Volume 151, Issue 1, pp 140–144 | Cite as

Septicaemia in a renal unit

  • J. Cronin
  • J. F. Walker
  • S. Hanson
  • J. Donohoe
  • M. Carmody
  • W. F. O’Dwyer
Article
  • 12 Downloads

Summary

BACTERIAL sepsis in the patient with renal failure has serious consequences. Medical records of 30 patients who had positive blood cultures from July 1979 to June 1980 were reviewed. Six cases were not significant. In the remaining 24 patients, 30 septicaemic episodes were identified. Eleven of the patients were on maintenance haemodialysis and had 14 staphylococcal septicaemias. Ten patients were post transplant and had 12 septicaemic episodes due to both gram-positive cocci and gram negative bacilli. Three patients who had chronic renal failure and were not on dialysis, had 3 gram negative septicaemias. Thirteen patients had staphyloccal septicaemia due in 11 cases to infection at vascular access sites. Three patients died (mortality 23%). Seven patients had gram negative septicaemia which was urinary tract in all cases with 2 deaths (mortality 28%).

Fifty-two patients received transplants in the period studied and 10 patients developed septicaemia (19%) and of those patients 5 died. Mortality and morbidity increased with the progressive combination of uraemia, haemodialysis and immunosuppression.

Keywords

Chronic Renal Failure Positive Blood Culture Rejection Episode Post Transplant Renal Unit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Cronin
    • 1
  • J. F. Walker
    • 1
  • S. Hanson
    • 1
  • J. Donohoe
    • 1
  • M. Carmody
    • 1
  • W. F. O’Dwyer
    • 1
  1. 1.The Department of Renal Medicine and TransplantationThe Charitable InfirmaryDublin 1

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