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Applied Scientific Research, Section B

, Volume 12, Issue 5–6, pp 424–434 | Cite as

Magnetohydrodynamic step slider bearing with variable viscosity

  • G. Ramanaiah
Article

Summary

Treating viscosity as a function of pressure, the problem of Magnetohydrodynamic step slider bearing with insulated bearing surfaces under an imposed transverse magnetic field is studied. It is found that the load supporting capacity of the bearing increases if the variation of viscosity with pressure is taken into account. The increase is much at large values of Hartmann number whereas the increase is very small at small Hartmann numbers.

Keywords

Pressure Distribution Riser Load Capacity Journal Bearing Variable Viscosity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Nomenclature

a

step height ratio,h 1/h2

B

magnetic induction field

B0

applied magnetic field

E

electric field strength

h

film thickness

I

current

J

current density

κ

=B 0 √σ/μ, κ0 =B 0 √σ/μ0

L

slider length in the direction of motion

M

Hartmann number,B 0 h 2 √σ/μ0

P

gauge pressure

pc

gauge pressure at riser location

Q

flow rate

R

dimensionless number, αp c/2

u

velocity inx-direction

U

velocity of the bearing surface

V

velocity field

W

load supporting capacity

( )1

refers to region I

( )2

refers to region II

(−)

corresponding non-dimensional quantity

α

empirical constant of dimension 1/p

μ

fluid viscosity

μ0

fluid viscosity at the inlet

μm

permeability of free space

σ

electrical conductivity

ρ

fluid density

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References

  1. 1).
    Snyder, W. T., Trans. ASME, Series D84 (1962) 197.Google Scholar
  2. 2).
    Hughes, W. F., Trans. ASME, Series D85 (1963) 129.Google Scholar
  3. 3).
    Hughes, W. F., Wear6 (1963) 315.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4).
    Kuzma, D. C., Trans. ASME, Series D85 (1963) 424.Google Scholar
  5. 5).
    Agarwal, J. P., ZAMM43 (1963) 181.CrossRefMATHGoogle Scholar
  6. 6).
    Kuzma, D. C., Machine Design36 (1964) 206.Google Scholar
  7. 7).
    Charnes, A. and E. Saibel, Trans. ASME75 (1955) 269.Google Scholar
  8. 8).
    Tao, L. N., Trans. ASME, Series E26 (1959) 179.MATHGoogle Scholar
  9. 9).
    Glasstone, S. and K. Laidler and H. Eyring, The Theory of Rate Processes, pp. 576–577, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1941.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff 1965

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Ramanaiah
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied MathematicsIndian Institute of TechnologyKharagpurIndia

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