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Intereconomics

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 115–123 | Cite as

How important is foreign direct investment for late industrialising countries?

  • Bettina Burger
Foreign Direct Investment

Abstract

While it has long been recognised that the process of development is necessarily linked to technology, the question of the efficiency of technological spillovers from foreign direct investment remains controversial. The following paper examines the theoretical background and then focuses on the case of Mexico, analysing the technological performance of multinational enterprises in that country.

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Host Country Technology Transfer Foreign Firm Local Firm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© HWWA and Springer-Verlag 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bettina Burger
    • 1
  1. 1.RWE-DEA Aktiengesellschaft für Mineraloel und ChemieHamburgGermany

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