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Intereconomics

, Volume 34, Issue 6, pp 303–316 | Cite as

High growth in China—Transition without a transition crisis?

  • Hansjörg Herr
  • Jan Priewe
Report

Abstract

Unlike other transition economies the People's Republic of China has so far not only avoided a severe transition crisis; it has apparently also managed to make economic transition a source of growth. However, the country now faces a number of crucial transition problems that centre around the debt situation of state-owned enterprises and the fragile condition of the financial system. Could these problems, for which solutions have repeatedly been postponed, trigger a late transition crisis?

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Fiscal Policy Chinese Economy Foreign Direct Investment Inflow International Financial Statistics 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© HWWA and Springer-Verlag 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hansjörg Herr
    • 1
  • Jan Priewe
    • 2
  1. 1.FHW Berlin (Berlin School of Economics)Germany
  2. 2.FHTW Berlin (University of Applied Sciences Berlin)Germany

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