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Intereconomics

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 41–48 | Cite as

Integration theory and the problems of integration policy in the Third World

  • Volker Nienhaus
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Abstract

The many groupings of developing countries formed in the fifties and sixties with a view to establishing a customs union have failed to achieve convincing results so far. Would another integration strategy have been more successful?

Keywords

Member Country Trade Liberalisation Custom Union Industrial Output Custom Certificate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Regarding integration groupings in general, see G. Schiavone: International Organizations, London and Basingstoke 1983; W. Andersen, W. Woyke: Handwörterbuch Internationale Organisationen, Opladen 1986.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    For further details, see V. Nienhaus: Außenwirtschaftliche integrationstheorie und die Integrationspolitik großer Entwicklungsländer-Gruppierungen, Berlin 1986/87 (forthcoming).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    See J. Viner: The Customs Union Issue, New York 1950; J. E. Meade: The Theory of Customs Unions, Amsterdam 1955; R. G. Lipsey: The Theory of Customs Unions—A General Survey, in: The Economic Journal, Vol. 70 (1960), pp. 496–513.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    See R. A. Mundell: Tariff Preferences and the Terms of Trade, in: Manchester School of Economic and Social Studies, Vol. 32 (1964), pp. 1–13; S. Arndt: On Discriminatory vs. Non-Preferential Tariff Policies, in: The Economic Journal, Vol. 78 (1968), pp. 971–979; W. M. Corden: Economies of Scale and Customs Union Theory, in: Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 80 (1972), pp. 465–474.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Cf. W. M. Corden: Customs Union Theory and the Nonuniformity of Tariffs, in: Journal of International Economics, Vol. 6 (1976), pp. 99–106; R. Riezman: A 3×3 Model of Customs Unions, in: Journal of International Economics, Vol. 9 (1979), pp. 341–354; E. Berglas: Preferential Trading Theory—The n Commodity Case, in: Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 87 (1982), pp. 315–331; W. Ethier, H. Horn: A New Look at Economic Integration, Seminar Paper 221, Institute for International Economic Studies, Stockholm 1982.Google Scholar
  6. 7.
    Cf. H. G. Johnson: An Economic Theory of Protectionism, Tariff Bargaining, and the Formation of Customs Unions, in: Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 73 (1965), pp. 256–282; C. A. Cooper, B. F. Massell: Toward a General Theory of Customs Unions for Developing Countries, in: Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 73 (1965), pp. 461–476.Google Scholar
  7. 9.
    Cf. P. G. Elkan: How to Beat Backwash—The Case for Customs-Drawback Unions, in: The Economic Journal, Vol. 75 (1965) pp. 44–62; P. G. Elkan: Blueprint for an Area of Quantitatively and Structurally Balanced Free Trade, in: Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 5 (1966/67), pp. 1–12.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© HWWA and Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Volker Nienhaus
    • 1
  1. 1.University of BochumBochum

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