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Intereconomics

, Volume 33, Issue 4, pp 171–176 | Cite as

Trade policy and human rights

  • Michael Leicht
Labour Standards

Abstract

This year's International Labour Conference from 2nd to 18th June adopted a declaration of principles concerning fundamental workers' rights. What can the World Trade Organisation do to help establish these rights, and what economic effects can be expected?

Keywords

Labour Standard Free Trade Trade Policy Collective Bargaining Child Labour 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© HWWA and Springer-Verlag 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Leicht
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ZurichSwitzerland

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