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Intereconomics

, Volume 29, Issue 3, pp 139–146 | Cite as

Export promotion in the context of technical cooperation

Reorientation and an alternative advisory approach
  • Stephan Opitz
North-South Relations
  • 26 Downloads

Abstract

A large number of developing countries have introduced trade policy reforms in recent years. These have been supported by export promotion projects in the context of bilateral and multilateral development cooperation. The results of the advisory approach so far adopted have been disappointing on the whole, so a reorientation is now taking place in the design of export promotion. This article describes an alternative advisory approach by taking the Indo-German Export Promotion Project (IGEP) as an illustration.

Keywords

Trade Fair Target Market Policy Dialogue Export Promotion Gold Jewellery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© HWWA and Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephan Opitz
    • 1
  1. 1.Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW)FrankfurtGermany

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