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Intereconomics

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 172–177 | Cite as

Should the Asian NICs peg to the yen?

  • Helmut Reisen
  • Axel van Trotsenburg
Exchange Rate Policy

Abstract

Recently, the calls for closer monetary co-operation between the Asian NICs and Japan have been becoming louder. The following article discusses the pros and cons of pegging to the yen and compares them with those of a basket peg.

Keywords

Exchange Rate Current Account Foreign Exchange Real Exchange Rate Purchase Power Parity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© HWWA and Springer-Verlag 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helmut Reisen
    • 1
  • Axel van Trotsenburg
    • 1
  1. 1.OECD Development CentreParisFrance

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