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Intereconomics

, Volume 14, Issue 4, pp 172–179 | Cite as

Are the developing countries in reality “Exporters of capital”?

  • Peter Richter
Articles Capital Transfer
  • 17 Downloads

Abstract

The developing countries have missed no opportunity at any of the great international conferences in recent years to raise the demand for larger capital transfers by the developed countries. Whether compliance with this demand can really contribute to narrowing the North-South gap must however be doubted. According to the following calculations interest payments, royalties and—overt or hidden— profit retransfers have already reached such an amazing dimension that the developing countries would in reality have to be regarded as “capital exporters”.

Keywords

Direct Investment Transfer Price Capital Inflow Public Capital Underdeveloped Country 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© HWWA and Springer-Verlag 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Richter
    • 1
  1. 1.Freie Universität BerlinBerlin

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