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Biologia Plantarum

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 189–197 | Cite as

A comparative study of the effect of morphactin and Niagara on the leaf epidermis

  • Nilima Paliwal
  • Bhaskar Barma
  • G. S. Paliwal
Article

Abstract

Treatment of two-week-oldBrassica campestris andTrigonella foenum-graecum plants with morphactin andVicia faba, Antirrhinum orontium, andPapaver somniferum with Niagara, induced marked variations in the orientation and ontogeny of stomata and the epiderma cells. Morphactin—chlorflurenol at 12.5, 62.5, 125, 250, and 500 ppm, caused marked damage of the shoot apices and changes in the epidermal tissue, such as divisions of the guard cells, reduction in the size of the stomata, and epidermal cells. Niagara—ethyl-hydrogen-1-propylphosphonate at 100, 500, 1 000 5 000, and 10 000 ppm caused thickenings of the epidermal cell walls and differentiation of new meristemoids from the epidermal cells, contiguous stomata, and incomplete development of the guard cells.

Keywords

Epidermal Cell Guard Cell Morphactin Epidermal Peel Stomatal Frequency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Srovnávací studie vlivu morphactinu a niagary na listovou epidermis

Abstract

Morphactin (chlorflurenol) a niagara (ethyl-hydrogen-1-propylfosfát) vyvolaly výrazné změny v orientaci a ontogenesi průduchů a epidermálních buněk. Morphactin působil poškození vzrostných vrcholů, dělení svěracích buněk a zmenšení průduchů a epidermálních buněk. Po působení niagary bylo zjištěno tloustnutí buněčných stěn v epidermis, diferenciace nových meristemoidů z epidermálních buněk, dotýkající se průduchy a neúplný vývoj svěracích buněk.

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References

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Copyright information

© Institute of Experimental Botany 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nilima Paliwal
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bhaskar Barma
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. S. Paliwal
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BotanyUniversity of DelhiDelhi
  2. 2.Division of BiologyRamjas SchoolDelhi

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