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Characterization of dust and non-dust aerosols with SEM/EDX

  • Qi Jianhua
  • Li Xianguo
  • Feng Lijuan
  • Zhang Manping
Research Papers

Abstract

Total suspended particulate (TSP) samples were collected at three sites along the coast of Qingdao, China, before and during a major dust storm in March, 2002. For comparison, PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 10 μm) samples were collected at one of the three sites. The morphological observation and compositional analysis of bulk and individual particles were performed by using scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray system (SEM/EDX) for the TSP and PM10 samples. The results showed that the particles of different kinds of morphology had different elemental compositions, but the particles of similar morphology did not always have the same elemental composition for non-dust samples. The morphology and composition of non-dust particles were different at different sites. The fractal and spherical particles existed mainly in the coarse fraction for non-dust samples, while in the fine mode (<10 μm) there were floccules formed by fine particles flocking together and containing crustal elements. Compared with the non-dust particles, the dust particles were more homogeneous in terms of morphology, particle size and composition. Particles with irregular shapes and well-distributed sizes dominated in the dust samples, containing crustal elements such as Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Fe,etc. The high sulfur content indicated that homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions took place on the surfaces of the dust particles in the specific environment of Qingdao.

Key words

aerosol individual particle soanning electron microscopy 

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Copyright information

© Journal of Ocean University of China and Science Press 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qi Jianhua
    • 1
  • Li Xianguo
    • 2
  • Feng Lijuan
    • 2
  • Zhang Manping
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Environmental Science and EngineeringOcean University of ChinaQingdaoP. R. China
  2. 2.College of Chemistry and Chemical EngineeringOcean University of ChinaQingdaoP. R. China

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