Advertisement

Advances in Atmospheric Sciences

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 454–466 | Cite as

The Scandinavia ozone loss and surface heating

  • Zhou Libo
  • Zou Han
  • Ji Chongping
  • Wang Wei
  • Jian Yongxiao
Article

Abstract

Analysis on NASA Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) ozone shows a clear ozone loss, −50 DU (15% of the total ozone), over Scandinavia. Correlation analysis between the ozone loss and the east-to-west sea surface temperature (SST) contrast in the North Atlantic shows correlation coefficients −0.96 for seasonal variation and −0.70 for monthly mean (168 months) in 1979–1992. Correlation coefficients between the ozone loss and the surface-to-atmosphere heat fluxes are higher than −0.87. There-fore the authors suggest that the warm Atlantic current carries energy northward to Scandina via and causes ozone loss there via the surface-to-atmosphere heating processes.

Key words

Ozone loss North Atlantic Surface heating Scandina via 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Appenzeller, C., and J. R. Holton, 1996: Seasonal variation of mass transport across the tropopause.J. Geophys. Res.,D10, 15071–15078.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Braathen, G. O., M. Rummukainen, E. Kyro, U. Schmidt, A. Dahlback, T. S. Jorgensen, R. Fabian, V. V. Rudakov, M. Gil, and R. Borchers, 1994: Temporal development of ozone with the Arctic vortex during the winter of 1991/92.Geophys. Res. Lett. 21(13), 1407–1410.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bojkov, R. D., L. Bishop, W. J. Hill, G. C. Reinsel, and G. C. Tiao, 1990: A statistic trend analysis of revised Dobson total ozone data over the Northern Hemisphere.J. Geophys. Res.,95, 9785–9807.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Farman, J. G., and J. D. Shaklin, 1985: Large losses of total ozone in Antarctic reveal seasonal CLOx/NOx interaction.Nature,315, 207–210.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Gathen, P., M. Rex, N. R. P. Harris, D. Lucic, B. M. Knudsen, G. O. Braathen, H. D. Backer, R. Fabian, H. Fast, M. Gil, E. Kyro, I. S. Mikkelsen, M. Rummukainen, J. Stahelin, and C. Varotsos 1995: Observed evidence for chemical ozone depletion over the Arctic in winter 1991–92.Nature,375, 131–134.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Holton, J. R., 1992:An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology, Academy Press, San Diego, California, USA, 511 pp.Google Scholar
  7. Kundsen, B. M., N. Larsen, I. S. Mikkelsen, J. J. Morerette, G. O. Braathen, E. Kyro, H. Fast, H. Gernandt, H. Kanzawa, H. Nakane, V. Dorokhov, V. Yushkov, G. Hansen, M. Gil, and R. J. Shearman, 1998: Ozone depletion in and below the Arctic vortex for 1997.Geophys. Res. Lett. 25(5), 627–630.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Muller R., P. J. Crutzen, J.-U. Grooss, C. Bruhl, J. M. Russell III, H. Gernandt, D. S. McKenna, and A. F. Tuc, 1997: Severe chemical ozone loss in the Arctic during the winter of 1995–96.Nature,389, 709–712.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Orsolini, Y., D. Cariolle, and M. Deque, 1995: Ridge formation in the lower stratosphere and its influence on zzone transport: A general circulation model study during late January 1992.J. Geophys. Res.,100(D6), 11113–11135.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Peixoto, J., and A. H. Oort, 1992.Physics of Climate, American Institute of Physics, New York, USA, 200pp.Google Scholar
  11. Pierce, R. B., T. D. Fairlie, E. E. Remsberg, J. M. Russell III, and W. L. Grose, 1997. HALOE observations of the Arctic vortex during the 1997 spring: horizontal structure in the lower stratosphere.Geophys. Res. Lett.,24(22), 2701–2704.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Reinsel, G. C., G. C. Tiao, D. J. Wuebbles, J. B. Kerr, A. J. Miller, R. M. Nagatani, L. Bishop, and L. H. Ying, 1994: Seasonal trend analysis of published ground-based and TOMS total ozone data through 1991.J. Geophys. Res.,99(D3), 5449–5464.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Rex, M., N. R. P. Harris, P. Von Der Gathen, R. Lehmann, G. O. Braathen, E. Reimer, A. Beck, M. P. Chipperfield, R. Alfier, M. Allaart, F. O'Connor, H. Dier, V. Dorokhov, H. Fast, M. Gil, E. Kyro, Z. Litynska, I. S. Mikkelsen, M. G. Molynneux, H. Nakane, J. Notholt, M. Rummukainen, P. Viatte, and J. Wenger, 1997: Prolonged stratospheric ozone loss in the 1995–96 Arctic winter.Nature,389, 835–838.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Stolarski, R. S., R. Bojkov, L. Bishop, C. Zerefos, J. Staehdin, and J. Zawodny, 1992: Measured trends in stratospheric ozone.Science,256, 342–349.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Waibel, A. E., T. H. Peter, K. S. Carslaw, H. Oelhaf, G. Wetzel, P. J. Crutzen, U. Poschl, A. Tsias, E. Reimer, and H. Fischer, 1999: Arctic ozone loss due to denitrification.Science,283, 2064–2069.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. WMO, 1985: Atmospheric ozone 1985, Assessment of our understanding of process controlling its distribution and change, Global ozone research and monitoring project (Rep. 16, Geneva, 333, WMO, 1985).Google Scholar
  17. Yeh, T. C., and Y. X. Gao, 1979:Meteorology of Tibetan Plateau. Science Press, Beijing, China, 278 pp (in Chinese).Google Scholar
  18. Zou, H., 1996: Seasonal variation and trends of TOMS ozone over Tibet.Geophys. Res. Lett.,23(9), 1029–1032.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Zou, H., and Y. Gao, 1997: Vertical ozone profile over Tibet using SAGE I and II data.Advances in Atmospheric Sciences,14(4), 505–512.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Advances in Atmospheric Sciences 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhou Libo
    • 1
  • Zou Han
    • 1
  • Ji Chongping
    • 1
  • Wang Wei
    • 1
  • Jian Yongxiao
    • 1
  1. 1.Environment and Polar Program, Institute of Atmospheric PhysicsChinese Academy of SciencesBeijing

Personalised recommendations