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Whole body impedance measurements reflect total body water changes. A study in hemodialysis patients

  • Olle Ljungqvist
  • Gunilla Hedenborg
  • Stefan H Jacobson
  • Lars-Eric Lins
  • Kickan Samuelson
  • Bo Tedner
  • Ulla-Britt Zetterholm
Article

Abstract

Fluid volume changes during hemodialysis was monitored by continuous whole body impedance measurements. The fluid changes recorded using this method was compared to fluid volume changes measured in plasma water (PV) using125I-albumin, and extracellular volume (ECV) using51Cr-EDTA before and after treatment, and total body water (TBW) changes reflected by continuous bed scale monitoring. Changes in impedance correlated to TBW changes, r=0.80, p<0.001, while correlations to changes in ECV and PV were: r=0.57 and r=0.55, respectively, p<0.05. Alterations in body fluid volumes recorded with whole body impedance is best correlated to total body water changes.

The use of continuous whole body impedance monitoring has been shown to offer a simple non-invasive method for recording total body water changes during hemodialysis.

Key words

body fluid volumes hemodialysis isotope techniques whole body impedance 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olle Ljungqvist
    • 1
  • Gunilla Hedenborg
    • 2
  • Stefan H Jacobson
    • 3
  • Lars-Eric Lins
    • 3
  • Kickan Samuelson
    • 2
  • Bo Tedner
    • 4
  • Ulla-Britt Zetterholm
    • 3
  1. 1.Dept of SurgeryKarolinska Institute and HospitalStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Dept of Clinical ChemistryKarolinska Institute and HospitalStockholmSweden
  3. 3.Dept of MedicineKarolinska Institute and HospitalStockholmSweden
  4. 4.Dept of BaromedicineKarolinska Institute and HospitalStockholmSweden

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