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Geosciences Journal

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 137–145 | Cite as

Permeable reactive barrier using atomized slag material for treatment of contaminants from landfills

  • Ha Ik Chung
  • Sang Keun Kim
  • Yong Soo Lee
  • Jun Yu
Article

Abstract

This paper presented a permeable reactive barrier using atomized slag material for the treatment of landfill leachate and contaminated ground water. This study investigated the feasibility of using atomized slag and modified by products from iron and steel making industries as new reactive material for leachate treatment. Batch and column tests, and field pilot tests were performed as model systems to explore the effect of atomized slag as an alternative reactive material. From the evaluation of various atomized slag based PRB systems, a combination of an atomized slag and sand system was found to have a substantial reaction capacity for leachate and organics, thus it has the potential to be used in the permeable reactive barriers for a subsurface remediation. The test results showed that the adsorption capacity is high in the order of pH 7>pH 5>pH 9, the heavy metal removal rate is high in the order of Cd>Pb>Cr>Cu, and organic removal rate is high in the order of T-P>COD>T-N.

Key words

atomized slag reaction permeable reactive barrier treatment contamination 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ha Ik Chung
    • 1
  • Sang Keun Kim
    • 1
  • Yong Soo Lee
    • 1
  • Jun Yu
    • 1
  1. 1.Korea Institute of Construction TechnologyIlsan Gyeonggi-doKorea

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