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Bulletin of Materials Science

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 15–34 | Cite as

Alpha-quartz 1. Crystallography and crystal defects

  • Prasenjit Saha
  • N Annamalai
  • Tarun Bandyopadhyay
Article

Abstract

Crystallography of alpha-quartz is discussed with special reference to the existing ambiguities regarding handedness of its enantiomorphic forms and a mnemonic has been suggested. Previous x-ray diffraction topographic studies of synthetic quartz are critically reviewed and analysed to understand the origin, nature and location of dislocations. It is suggested that dislocations associated with cell boundaries, characteristic of the Z-zone grown portions of synthetic quartz, are pure a-type edge dislocations but possibly with an alternating non-conservative climb component associated with the predominating glide component.

Keywords

Burger Vector Cobble Dislocation Line Crystal Defect Prism Plane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© the Indian Academy of sciences 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Prasenjit Saha
    • 1
  • N Annamalai
    • 1
  • Tarun Bandyopadhyay
    • 1
  1. 1.Central Glass and Ceramic Research InstituteJadavpur, Calcutta

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