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Economic Botany

, Volume 50, Issue 3, pp 252–269 | Cite as

Extraction of non-timber forest products in the forests of Biligiri Rangan Hills, India. 2. Impact of NTFP extraction on regeneration, population structure, and species composition

  • K. S. Murali
  • Uma Shankar
  • R. Uma Shaanker
  • K. N. Ganeshaiah
  • K. S. Bawa
Article

Abstract

Sustainable extraction of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) has recently gained considerable attention as a means to enhance rural incomes and conserve tropical forests. However, there is little information on the amounts of products collected per unit area and the impact of extraction on forest structure and composition. In this paper we estimate the quantities of selected products gathered by the Soligas, the indigenous people in the Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple (BRT) sanctuary in Karnataka, India, and examine the effect of extraction on forest structure and composition. Two sites, distant (DS) and proximal (PS), were identified based on the proximity to a Soliga settlement. The frequency of different size classes indicates that regeneration overall is poor in the area. The two sites show differences in species richness, basal area, and tree mortality. Furthermore, non-timber forest product species show a greater deficit of small size classes than the timber forest species, suggesting that regeneration is affected by collection of seeds and fruits from non-timber forest product species. Regeneration, however, may also be affected by other anthropogenic pressures such as fire, grazing and competition with weeds.

Key Words

non-timber forest products (NTFPs) human usage forest regeneration Soligas 

Extração de Produtos Não Madereiros Nas Florestas de Biligiri Rangan Hills, India. 2. Impacto da Extração de Produtos Nao Madereiros Na Regeneracao, Estrutura de População e Composicao de Espécies

Résumé

A exploração sustentavel de produtos forestais não madereiros tern ganho recentemente considardvel atencao como um meio de aumentar a renda rural e conservar florestas tropicals. No entanto, existem poucas informações sobre a relacao entre quantidade de produtos coletados e impacto da extração na estrutura e composicdo dafloresta. Duas áreas de pesquisa, distal (DS) e proximal (PS), foram selecionadas de acordo com suas proximidades com uma tribo de Soligas. A frequencia de diferentes classes de tamanho de planta indica que a regeneragao de uma forma geral é baixa. Ambas as areas mostraram diferencas em riqueza de espécies, área basal e mortalidade de árvores. Além disso, espécies cuja madeira é explorada possuem um menor déficit no estágio de plántula do que espécies cujos frutos e sementes são explorados. Isto sugere que a exploração de sementes e frutos afeta a regeneração. No entanto, a regeneração pode também ser afetada por pressão antropogénica, tais como: fogo, pastagem e competição com ervas daninhas.

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Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. S. Murali
    • 1
  • Uma Shankar
    • 1
  • R. Uma Shaanker
    • 2
  • K. N. Ganeshaiah
    • 3
  • K. S. Bawa
    • 4
  1. 1.Tata Energy Research InstituteBangaloreIndia
  2. 2.Department of Crop PhysiologyUniversity of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK CampusBangaloreIndia
  3. 3.Department of Plant Genetics and BreedingUniversity of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK CampusBangaloreIndia
  4. 4.Department of BiologyUniversity of MassachusettsBostonUSA

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