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Conceptualizing unfamiliar content

  • John F. Wedman
Articles

Abstract

In order to participate effectively in the instructional development process, an instructional designer must quickly develop a conceptualization of the content to be included in the instruction. The conceptualization is based on content-related information acquired from a variety of sources, such as the designer’s prior knowledge, a subject-matter expert, or printed subject-matter materials. This article provides an overview of techniques an instructional designer can use to examine printed subject-matter materials when conceptualizing unfamiliar content.

Keywords

Subject Matter Content Area Instructional Development Graphic Organizer Psychomotor Domain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© the Association for Educational Communications and Technology 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • John F. Wedman
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MissouriColumbia

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