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Economic Botany

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 3–20 | Cite as

Useful native plants in the American southwestern deserts

  • A. Krochmal
  • S. Paur
  • P. Duisberg
Semi-Popular Article

Abstract

In addition to yuccas, creosote bush, prickly pear cactus, aǵaves and the wax-producinǵ candelilla bush, all of which have already yielded to some commercial exploitation, scores of other plants listed in this article also ǵrow in the reǵion and contain industrial potentialities.

Keywords

Tannin Bark Saponin Economic Botany Jojoba 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 1954

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Krochmal
    • 1
  • S. Paur
    • 2
  • P. Duisberg
    • 2
  1. 1.Science Instructor, Agricultural InstituteState University of New YorkDelhi
  2. 2.Formerly Assistant AgronomistNew Mexico Experiment StationMexico

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